More North/South Divide Statistics

Standard

Area A (figures as at August 2013)

Percentage of resident population claiming:

Jobseeker’s Allowance = 6.4.
Employment and Support Allowance & Incapacity Benefit = 7.4
Lone Parents = 2.1
Carers = 2.0
Others on income related benefits = 0.5
Disabled = 1.4
Bereaved = 0.2

Key out-of-work benefits = 16.4

Area B (figures as at August 2013)

Percentage of resident population claiming:

Jobseeker’s Allowance = 4.4
Employment and Support Allowance & Incapacity Benefit = 9.9
Lone Parents = 1.9
Carers = 1.8
Others on income related benefits = 0.6
Disabled = 1.5
Bereaved = 0.2

Key out-of-work benefits = 16.8

Area C (figures as at August 2013)

Percentage of resident population claiming:

Jobseeker’s Allowance = 4.4
Employment and Support Allowance & Incapacity Benefit = 7.4
Lone Parents = 1.5
Carers = 1.6
Others on income related benefits = 0.4
Disabled = 1.1
Bereaved = 0.1

Key out-of-work benefits = 13.7

Area D (figures as at August 2013)

Percentage of resident population claiming:

Jobseeker’s Allowance = 3.4
Employment and Support Allowance & Incapacity Benefit = 5.5
Lone Parents = 1.4
Carers = 1.0
Others on income related benefits = 0.3
Disabled = 0.9
Bereaved = 0.1

Key out-of-work benefits = 10.6

Great Britain (figures as at August 2013)

Percentage of resident population claiming:

Jobseeker’s Allowance = 3.2
Employment and Support Allowance & Incapacity Benefit = 6.1
Lone Parents = 1.3
Carers = 1.3
Others on income related benefits = 0.4
Disabled = 1.2
Bereaved = 0.2

Key out-of-work benefits = 10.9

Source: DWP benefit claimants – working age client group

 

Key out-of-work benefits includes the groups: job seekers, ESA and incapacity benefits, lone parents and others on income related benefits. See the Definitions and Explanations below for details
Note: % isa proportion of resident population of area aged 16-64DWP Working-Age Client Group

The number of working-age people who are claiming one or more key DWP benefits. The key benefits are: bereavement benefit, carer’s allowance, disability living allowance, ESA and incapacity benefit, severe disablement allowance, income support, jobseeker’s allowance, and widow’s benefit. The age at which women reach State Pension age is gradually increasing from 60 to 65 between April 2010 and April 2020. Throughout this period, only women below State Pension age are counted as working age benefit claimants.”

The total count is broken down by statistical groups. These categorise each person according to the main reason why they are claiming benefit. Each client is classified to a single group.

Benefits are arranged hierarchically and claimants are assigned to a group according to the top most benefit they receive. Thus a person who is a lone parent and receives Incapacity Benefit would be classified as incapacity benefits. Consequently, the group lone parent will not contain all lone parents as some will be included in the incapacity benefits group and Job seekers groups.

Key out-of-work benefits consists of the groups: job seekers, ESA and incapacity benefits, lone parents and others on income related benefits.

These groups have been chosen to best represent a count of all those benefit recipients who cannot be in full-time employment as part of their condition of entitlement. Those claiming solely Bereavement Benefits or Disability Living Allowance (DLA) are not included as these are not out-of-work or income based benefits. DLA is paid to those needing help with personal care. These people can, and some will, be in full-time employment. If DLA claimants are also in receipt of JSA, IS, ESA or Incapacity Benefits in addition to DLA they will be counted under the relevant statistical group. In addition, we exclude those claiming solely carer’s benefits or claiming carer’s benefits alongside income support, as DWP does not pursue active labour market policies for this group. Carers benefits are paid to those with full time caring responsibilities. The group entitled to Carer’s benefits alongside Income Support (IS) includes around 86,000 claimants and has been stable over time.

This Nomis series is different to that published in the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Labour Market Statistics Bulletin (table 25) and on the DWP website at http://83.244.183.180/100pc/wa/tabtool_wa.html (against the link entitled “One-Click” Key Out-of-Work Benefits). This Nomis series uses DWP Jobseeker’s Allowance numbers, whilst the other two series use the ONS claimant count for Jobseeker’s Allowance. Details of the difference between these series can be found at http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/differences.pdf

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2 thoughts on “More North/South Divide Statistics

  1. val

    Hi John D. Turner
    Just a minor point.
    Correct me if I am wrong, but isn’t the information you have included about women’s state pension age the New Labour Policy? In 2010, the Coalition craftily and unfairly changed it by moving the goal posts so that a cohort of women born around 1954, would be the biggest losers. Allow me to quote from an article by Julian Knight on October 22, 2010, in ‘The Independent’ –

    ” Women will be the biggest losers from the rise in the state pension age. The age at which women can collect the state pension was supposed to rise gradually from 60 to 65 by 2020, but under the Coalition’s plans it will rise further and faster. The state pension age for women will reach 65 by December 2018 and 66 by April 2020, bringing it in line with men.”

    You will need to refer to the DWP chart of women’s state pension age showing the accelation. It was considered grossly unfair because, for example, a woman born in April 1953 would receive her state pension 1yr 5mths sooner than a woman born in December 1953, the same birthyear. Duncan-Smith wanted a 2 year delay but had to do a U-turn at the last moment due to pressure from the opposition and a fair amount of publicity.

    Like

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